HKIPF
Major

Provoke the Age, the Acts: 50 Years’ Quest for a Language to Come

26.10—
02.12.2018
Time
12:00nn – 8:00pm
Curator
Nagasawa Akio
About
NAGASAWA Akio (1968 - ) is Director of Akio Nagasawa, both a gallery and publisher, and also Director of Daido Moriyama Photo Foundation. He curates exhibitions internationally, including the shows at his own two Tokyo gallery spaces in Ginza and Aoyama. Nagasawa also publishes photo books and catalogues and provides art direction consultancy for commercial facilities such as hotels and boutiques.

Major exhibitions and events he has curated include “Labyrinth” by Moriyama Daido at Les Rencontres d'Arles, 2013, “Pas de Deux” by Hosoe Eikoh and William Klein at Les Rencontres d'Arles, 2016, “Daido Moriyama Printing Show” at Tate Modern, London, 2012, and Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain, Paris, 2016.
Artists
  • Hamaguchi TakashiAbout
    Hamaguchi Takashi (1931-2018)

    Born in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, Hamaguchi Takashi took up an interest in photography as a youngster, and in 1955, still in his twenties, he opened his own independent camera store in Yokohama. The following year, he registered with the photojournalist association Nihon Hodo-Shashin Renmei that had been established by the Mainichi Newspaper. Hamaguchi was then able to further pursue photography and develop his own techniques. His image of a student throwing a rock at Crown Prince Akihito’s wedding carriage was widely published, bringing him significant attention. Following this, he recorded various socio-political issues and events surrounding American military bases in Japan, the Niigata earthquake, student struggles, and Sanrizuka struggles.

    In 1968, his solo-exhibition “Record and Instant” was held at the Nikon Salon photography gallery, and a year later his first photobook was published under the same title. The ‘Niigata Earthquake’ and ‘American Military Base’ photographs featured in “Record and Instant” received the Prime Minister’s Prize in the All-Japan Mainichi Photography Competition and First Prize in the Images of Japan award from the journal, Asahi Camera. Several book publications followed: the photobook University Struggle Towards ANPO 70 (1969); the series ‘Angle’ was published as Document Angle (1973), the series ‘Sanrizuka Struggle’ was published as The Shudders of Narita Airport (1978), photographs of war orphans visiting Japan but residing in China were compiled in the photobook Record of the Reunion of Japanese War Orphans Left in China (1982) and the photobook, Hymn to the North Sea (1985). His most recent photographic subjects include the Great Hanshin earthquake, volcanic eruptions and the Tohoku earthquake.

    In 1997, he received the Yokohama Culture Award for his tireless commitment to the development of art photography through documentary photography.
  • Hosoe EikohAbout
    Hosoe Eikoh (born 1933)

    Originally from Yonezawa in the northern prefecture of Yamagata, Hosoe Eikoh began his studies at the Tokyo College of Photography (now Tokyo Polytechnic University) in 1952. His artistic development was influenced by exchanges with Ei-Q, the leader of the Democratic Artists Association which dismissed the then existing art system.

    Hosoe held his first major solo exhibition “An American Girl in Tokyo” in 1956 and three years later, established the photo agency VIVO with the likes of Kawada Kikuji, Tomatsu Shomei and Narahara Ikko. A driving force of Japanese photography with his personal creative work, he won the Japan Photo Critics Association Newcomer's Award for his exhibition “Man and Woman” (1960), and produced a number of outstanding works including Barakei (Ordeal by Roses), his depiction of the aesthetic world of Mishima Yukio, and Kamaitachi, images of Butoh dancer Hijikata Tatsumi in rural Akita.

    Hosoe has also been instrumental in the popularization and development of photography in Japan. He has received several awards including the Arts Encouragement Prize from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (1970), the Medal with Purple Ribbon (1998), and the Mainichi Art Award (2008).

    His most well-known books are Barakei (1963), Kamaitachi (1969), Eikoh Hosoe (1986) and Simon: A Private Landscape (2012).
  • Kurata SeijiAbout
    Kurata Seiji (born 1945)

    Born in Nihonbashi, Tokyo, Kurata Seiji graduated from the painting department of Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music and practiced photography under Morayama Daido in his photography school “Work Shop” in 1976.

    In 1980, he won the 5th Kimura Ihei Award for his first photobook, Flash Up: Street Photo Random Tokyo 1975-1979. The series made a huge impact, featuring Tokyo’s nightlife in the roaring ‘70s, with biker gangs, yakuza, right-wing activists, and hostesses at cabarets and nightclubs.

    Kurata went on to publish two more books: 80's Family: Street Photo Random Japan (1991), which was awarded the annual prize of the Photographic Society of Japan in 1992, and Japan (1999), which won the Kodansha Publishing Culture Award.

    Solo exhibitions include “Street Photo Random Tokyo” (1979), “Tokyo: Theatrical Magalopolis” (1995), “Urban Landscape” (2008), and “Urban Landscape B&W” (2009).
  • Moriyama DaidoAbout
    Moriyama Daido (born 1938)

    Born in Osaka, Japan, Moriyama Daido worked as an assistant for photographers Iwamiya Takeji and Hosoe Eikoh before going independent in 1964. He has published widely in many magazines and photography publications and in 1967, received a New Artist Award from the Japan Photo Critics Association for “Japan: A Photo Theater”.

    Between 1968 and 1970, he was involved in the photo fanzine PROVOKE, where his grainy, high-contrast images that came to be referred to as “are, bure, boke” (grainy, blurry, out-of-focus) made an impact on the photographic art world. Solo shows at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (1999) and the Fondation Cartier pour l'Art Contemporain in Paris (2016) further solidified his worldwide reputation. In 2012, Moriyama became the first Japanese to be awarded a Lifetime Achievement award at the 28th Annual Infinity Awards hosted by the International Center of Photography (ICP), and the 2012-13 exhibition “William Klein + Daido Moriyama” at London’s Tate Modern took the world by storm.
  • Naito MasatoshiAbout
    Naito Masatoshi (born 1938)

    Born in Tokyo, Naito Masatoshi’s formative experience as a photographer was an encounter with the sokushinbutsu (a Buddha in this very body) culture in Mount Yudono, Yamagata prefecture at age 25. This deepened his interest in Shugendo, and in 1966, he joined the Haguro mountain priests’ ascetic practices and began to study the folk beliefs of the Tohoku region and published several photography books, Baba: Tohoku no Minkan Shinko (The Old Women: The Folk Religion in Tohoku) (1979), Dewa-sanzan to Shugen (Three Mountains of Dewa and Shugen) (1982), Tono Monogatari (Tales of Tono) (1983), and Tokyo: A Vision of its Other Side 1970-1985 (1985; Photographic Society of Japan Annual Award).

    He developed his unique style of photography, pointing the camera’s flash into darkness, the results of which have been published internationally. Naito has also published widely on folklore, sharing his diverse perspectives and unconventional ideas: Tohoku and Edo/Tokyo, natural and urban environments, and science and religion; these books include Miira shinko no kenkyu (Study of the Mummy Faith) (1974), Shugendo no seishin uchu (The spiritual cosmos Of Shugendo) (1991), Tono monogatari no genfukei (1994), and Nihon no miira shinko (1999).
  • Nakahira TakumaAbout
    Nakahira Takuma (1938 - 2015)

    Born in Tokyo, Nakahira Takuma graduated from the Spanish Department of Tokyo University of Foreign Studies before working for the magazine, Contemporary Eye. In the mid-1960s, he began publishing essays on photography and film in various magazines and about the same time, started taking photographs.

    Nakahira co-founded a quarterly coterie magazine, PROVOKE, subtitled “Provocative Materials for Thought” with TakiI Koji, Takanashi Yutaka, and Okata Takahiko, with Moriyama Daido contributing to the second and third issues. PROVOKE’s grainy, blurry and unfocused photographs moved away from established aesthetics and conventions, making a strong impact on Japan’s art world. A few years after the publication of the photo book For a Language to Come in 1970, Nakahira critically re-examined his previous photographs in the 1973 collection of writings Why an Illustrated Botanical Dictionary?. In November 1977, immediately after the publication of the seminal book Duel on Photography, which coupled Nakahira’s essays with photographs by Shiniyama Kishin, Nakahira was struck with an illness that brought him near death. Though tormented with memory loss and aphasia, Nakahira gradually recovered and started taking photographs once more.

    In the 1980s, he published two books of photography, A New Gaze and Adieu à X, and in 2002, Hysteric Six: Nakahira Takuma. In 2003, the large-scale retrospective “Nakahira Takuma: Degree Zero –Yokohama” was held at the Yokohama Museum of Art with more than 800 photograph from his formative period of the 1960s to 2003; the work received significant attention as did his 2013 solo exhibition, “Circulation: Date, Place, Events” in New York City at Yossi Milo Gallery. Nakahira Takuma passed away on 1 September, 2015.

    In 2017, the Art Institute of Chicago exhibited his previous works from the 7th Paris Biennial in a show titled “Circulation” which aura gallery (now renamed Each Modern) also exhibited in the same year. Nakahira’s essays have been translated and published internationally.
  • Nomura SakikoAbout
    Nomura Sakiko (born 1967)

    Born in Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi, Japan, Nomura graduated from Kyushu Sangyo University (Fine Arts, Photography and Imaging Arts) and became Nobuyoshi Araki’s disciple in 1991. Following her first solo exhibition “Clock Without Hand” in 1993, she participated in numerous acclaimed exhibitions, in Tokyo and throughout Asia and Europe. After winning the New Figure Encouragement Prize at Photo City Sagamihara in 2013, she has become a leading international photographer. Her books include Hadaka no jikan (Naked Time) (1997), Ai no jikan (Time of Love) (2000), Kuroneko (Black Cat) (2002), Yakan Hikou (Night Flight) (2008), Kuroyami (Black Darkness) (2008), Nude / A Room / Flowers (2012) and Another Black Darkness (2016).

    Nomura also received significant international acclaim with the group exhibition “Another Language” in France (2015).
  • Sawatari HajimeAbout
    Sawatari Hajime (born 1940)

    Born in Hongo, Tokyo, Sawatari Hajime began to publish his photography as an art student at Nihon University. Upon graduation, he worked at the Nippon Design Center and in 1966, became a freelance photographer, with a focus on fashion. He has published numerous fashion-related works in magazines such as Camera Mainichi and continues to work in the field.

    Sawatari’s books include Nadia: Forest Sprite (1973), masterly photographs of an Italian fashion model, Alice (1973) inspired by Alice in Wonderland, Taste of Honey (1990), 60's and 60's 2 (2001), and Kinky (2009). He has exhibited at Ginza Wacoal Hall, the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, and at various institutions across Japan.
  • SPEWAbout
    SPEW

    Formed in 2016, this group of three Japanese photographers collaborate on publications, performance art, installations and other photography-based activities under the name SPEW.
    Selected exhibitions include “I feel like mother of the world” (2018), ”Give me air" (2017) and "Mother" (2017).


    Yokota Daisuke (born 1983)
    Born in Saitama, Japan, Yokota graduated from the Nippon Photography Institute, and is one of Japan’s most highly acclaimed young artists. His work is seen as radical, exploiting the relationship between photography and memory, and often using the idea of reverberation and echo. His practice includes repeatedly manipulating an image, introducing accidents during the development process to create an analog, resolutely singular work. He also multiplies his experiments, shifting between digital and analog, and mixing techniques. In 2013, he had a solo exhibition at FOAM in Amsterdam, and in 2015, participated in “Another Language” at Discovery Award Rencontres d’Arles in France. In 2016, he won FOAM Paul Huf Award.

    Utagawa Naohiro (born 1981)
    Utagawa graduated from the law department of Chuo University. His solo exhibitions include “Assembly” (2017), “7Days aru / irukoto” (2016), “Table Top” (2014). In 2013, he published DAILY (SPACE CADET). He has won several awards, such as Foam Talent Call (2015), Canon New Cosmos of Photography Honorable Mention (2013), and was a finalist in The 8th “1_WALL” Photography Exhibition (2013).

    Kitagawa Koji (born 1973)
    Born in Osaka, Kitagawa has worked in a photography studio, published widely in magazines, and since 2001, has been a freelance photographer concentrating on making photobooks and participating in international book fairs. His book Hello was shortlisted for the Unseen Dummy Book Award (2014).
  • Suda IsseiAbout
    Suda Issei (born 1940)

    Born in Tokyo, Suda Issei graduated from the Tokyo College of Photography in 1962. He began working as an in-house photographer for Terayama Shuji’s experimental theatre troupe “Tenjo Sajiki” in 1967, and in 1971, went freelance. The 1976 Newcomer's Award from the Photographic Society of Japan for his exhibition “Fushi Kaden” catapulted him into the limelight, followed by two other significant accolades: the 1983 Photographic Society of Japan’s Annual Award for his “Monogusa Syui” exhibition and the 1st Domestic Photography Award at Higashikawa for “Nichijo no danpen” (1985). In 1997, his book Human Memory received several awards including the Domon Ken Prize, and in 2013, he held a large-scale retrospective exhibition “Nagi no hira – fragments of calm” at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum.

    Publications include Fushi Kaden (1978) also with a definitive edition in 2012, Waga Tokyo 100 (1979), Akai Hana – Scarlet Bloom (2000), and Anonymous Men and Women (2013). His recent photography exploring moments between reality and non-reality has been well-received in Japan and abroad.
  • Tomatsu ShomeiAbout
    Hosoe Eikoh (born 1933)

    Originally from Yonezawa in the northern prefecture of Yamagata, Hosoe Eikoh began his studies at the Tokyo College of Photography (now Tokyo Polytechnic University) in 1952. His artistic development was influenced by exchanges with Ei-Q, the leader of the Democratic Artists Association which dismissed the then existing art system.

    Hosoe held his first major solo exhibition “An American Girl in Tokyo” in 1956 and three years later, established the photo agency VIVO with the likes of Kawada Kikuji, Tomatsu Shomei and Narahara Ikko. A driving force of Japanese photography with his personal creative work, he won the Japan Photo Critics Association Newcomer's Award for his exhibition “Man and Woman” (1960), and produced a number of outstanding works including Barakei (Ordeal by Roses), his depiction of the aesthetic world of Mishima Yukio, and Kamaitachi, images of Butoh dancer Hijikata Tatsumi in rural Akita.

    Hosoe has also been instrumental in the popularization and development of photography in Japan. He has received several awards including the Arts Encouragement Prize from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (1970), the Medal with Purple Ribbon (1998), and the Mainichi Art Award (2008).

    His most well-known books are Barakei (1963), Kamaitachi (1969), Eikoh Hosoe (1986) and Simon: A Private Landscape (2012).
  • Yoshiyuki KoheiAbout
    Yoshiyuki Kohei (born 1946)

    Born in Hiroshima, Yoshiyuki Kohei first came to national attention with a series of infrared photographs of couples and voyeurs gathering in parks by night, published in Weekly Shincho in 1972. He started working as an in-house photographer for a British news agency in 1974, went freelance in 1978, and took on work for several magazines such as Focus and Shashin Gendai.

    Yoshiyuki’s first significant solo exhibition “Koen (Park)” was held at Komai Gallery in 1979. In 2007, his exhibition “The Park” at New York’s Yossi Milo Gallery featured new prints of photographs contained in the book Dokyumento: Koen (Document: Park), kicking off a string of further solo shows around the world. Collections of his work are held in numerous museums including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Books include Dokyumento: Koen (1980), Sekigai Kosen (Infrared Light) (1992), and The Park (2007).

Overview



First published in 1968, the legendary photography magazine PROVOKE of post-World War II Japan shook the art world and subverted traditional aesthetics of photography with its are, bure, boke (“grainy, blurry, out of focus”) B/W images. The magazine encapsulated the social atmosphere of the late 1960s, challenged existing photographic forms and frameworks, and continues to have a profound influence on Japanese photographers today.

 

At its inception, PROVOKE magazine was curated by art and photography critic TAKI Koji and photographer NAKAHIRA Takuma. The poet OKADA Takahiko and photographer TAKANASHI Yukata were later invited to join as members, with MORIYAMA Daido also joining from the second issue. Despite its closure after only the third issue, PROVOKE has become an icon in the Japanese art world.

 

The 2018 Hong Kong International Photo Festival spotlights the legendary magazine in a landmark exhibition “Provoke the age, the acts: 50 years’ quest for a language to come” curated by Tokyo-based curator NAGASAWA Akio. Through the eyes of a dozen emerging and prolific artists of the 1960s and 1970s – including Nakahira Takuma, Moriyama Daido, Tomatsu Shomei, Sawatari Hajime, Suda Issei, and the late Hamaguchi Takashi – we see the Tokyo of the PROVOKE era: a shifting metropolis in the midst of global upheaval, and a modern Japanese society in rapid transformation.

  • PROVOKE&Beyond Trailer

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